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This Airline is Using Stun Guns to Subdue Unruly Passengers – Your Aviation News Roundup

Korean Air carries stun guns aboard its planes to subdue unruly passengers. The little-known policy was made famous when on December 21st, 80’s pop star Richard Marx jumped in to help the crew subdue a drunken passenger. In a menacing photo, a Korean Air stewardess aims a stun gun at the passenger, but she never triggered it. Marx and several other passengers restrained the passenger with rope and brute force. The singer said the crew was not skilled in using the weapon, saying on his Facebook page, it was “completely ill-prepared and untrained” for the situation.

That is about to change. In a press conference, Korean Air President Chi Chang-hoon promised to loosen the restrictions placed on the crew with its use of stun guns and to better train crews on how to use them.

DOT Wants Customers Protected from Late Luggage

Baggage Carousel at HKG by Flickr user - Canadian Pacific - How to Make the Best out of a Lost Luggage Situation

Baggage fees have become a regular expense for passengers who have little choice but to pay an extra $25-$200 if they want to check luggage. But a new proposal could require airlines to reimburse those fees if the luggage is late. Under the late luggage regulation, customers would be eligible for a baggage-check fee refund if their luggage is “substantially delayed.” Currently, airlines are required to compensate passengers for expenses or damages if their luggage is damaged, lost or stolen.

Careful What You Name Your Wi-Fi Hotspot

Earlier this year, the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 was banned from airlines due to the likelihood of it catching fire. The phone was eventually discontinued and recalled.  So when a Virgin Airlines crew member saw “Samsung Galaxy Note7_1097” listed among the available networks on a flight from San Francisco to Boston, the pilot tried to track down its owner, threatening to divert the aircraft. The owner reluctantly stepped forward to reveal that it was actually a different device that had been given that name. By then, however, a subsequent flight on that plane had already been canceled, forcing passengers to be rerouted to a replacement flight.

The owner reluctantly stepped forward to reveal that it was actually a different device that had been given that name. By then, however, a subsequent flight on that plane had already been canceled, forcing passengers to be rerouted to a replacement flight.

Simulation Software Improves Helicopter Pilot Training

Helicopters often go where commercial airlines can’t, flying near skyscrapers and mountains to transport passengers and goods. For pilots, this type of mission can be risky, and traditional training can only go so far to alleviate that risk. New flight simulation software developed at the University of Munich will make it easier to train pilots for less-than-optimum flying conditions, including rapid changes in wind speeds and turbulence. The Munich team is working with researchers at the U.S. Naval Academy, George Washington University and the University of Maryland to test the software.

Stephanie is an experienced editor and writer, working on projects that range from books to blogs. She covers such topics as addiction, law, real estate, SEO, and technology. She has experience in many different genres and types of written communication.

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